The Michael Jackson Archives
Michael Jackson and Sheila E in Oakland California. 1979
Oct 16

Michael Jackson and Sheila E in Oakland California. 1979

Michael Jackson on the February 1983 cover of Rolling Stone magazinephotographer: Bonnie Schiffman
Sep 18

Michael Jackson on the February 1983 cover of Rolling Stone magazine

photographer: Bonnie Schiffman

Aug 16

On September 19, 1987, Michael Jackson scored his seventh solo #1 single on the Billboard Hot 100 with “I Just Can’t Stop Loving You” featuring vocalist Siedah Garrett. That same day, Jackson’s next single, “Bad” debuted on the Hot 100 at #40

Jul 25

Michael reunited with his brothers to perform a medley of their hits “I Want You Back”, “The Love You Save”, “Never Can Say Goodbye”, and “I’ll Be There”. Jermaine was also there, performing with his brothers for the first time since leaving the group. (Motown 25 - 1983)

(Source: mjjsecretlovers, via brandonousley)

"I’m proud of my heritage. I’m proud of it. I’m proud to be black. I’m honored to be black, and I just hope one day they will be fair in portraying me the way I really, really am….just a loving, peaceful guy wanting to make wonderful, unprecedented entertainment and songs and music and film for the world. That’s all I want to do. I’m no threat. I just want to do that. That’s what I want to do. To bring joy to the world."

- Michael Jackson (via seriouseffect)

(Source: myinspirationmj, via fuckyeahoffthewall)

Jul 25
Michael on the cover of GQ magazine in October 1994. The cover story was “Was Michael Jackson Framed?” by Mary A Fischer, which covered in the 1993 child abuse allegations against Jackson. 

you can read the story here http://floacist.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/gq-article-was-michael-jackson-framed/
Jul 18

Michael on the cover of GQ magazine in October 1994. The cover story was “Was Michael Jackson Framed?” by Mary A Fischer, which covered in the 1993 child abuse allegations against Jackson. 

you can read the story here http://floacist.wordpress.com/2007/08/22/gq-article-was-michael-jackson-framed/

Jul 6

Michael Jackson in downtown Tokyo in September 1987

Jul 6

Michael Jackson in September 1987 in Japan

Jun 27

alchrista:

"Leave Me Alone" (1989)

"For most directors, when they were done shooting the live action, they were kind of done," says Jim Blashfield, who directed "Leave Me Alone." "We had just begun." Blashfield’s "absurd process" for the clip meant a three-day shoot with Jackson, followed by a nine-month animating trek. Commissioned to do a video on "Michael’s idiosyncrasies," Blashfield and his team of animators shot Jackson on 35mm film, had those images turned into stills, then cut figures out with X-Acto knives and layered them by the dozens. The playful, self-aware results sent Jackson through a fun house of tabloid rumors that added another level to the song’s anti-media anger.

Jim Blashfield, director: Michael was really very open to this idea. The fact that he would think it would be OK to represent his plastic surgey, with the nose and the scalpel, it was just pretty great. I heard through the grapevine Michael’s mother didn’t like that particular image that much. Bubbles was not a problem. Bubbles, your job here is to crawl all over the rocket ship as it slowly rotates on this thing that you use to shoot car ads. Bubbles, please crawl over from here to here. And then please do not harm the python.

Michael was always up and ready to go, good-spirited. He was mostly in one set of clothes. It was an easy shoot for Michael. His hair didn’t catch on fire or anything.

If you wanna know how come it took nine months, we’re down on an animal preserve photographing llamas and peacocks. And then we’re off at Oak’s Park, the local amusement park, photographing things there. We’re out photographing skies. Some skies are better then others.

Each and every bit of it is made up of still images that are all stacked on top of one another on a piece of glass. Look in any one scene and look how many different things there are going on, so each one of those had to have its own shoot. There’s a splash that shows up throughout the entire video, and that was so time consuming to cut out that we just had one and it was passed around. Whoever was doing the scene and needed the splash would get to use it for a while. There was a guy, he specialized in that splash, and I think he worked on it for weeks. He also was responsible for hair. So he looked like somebody out of Dickens. He sat on this tall stool kind of hunched over, with these odd glasses that jewelers or somebody wears. Just cutting one 32nd of an inch after another.

(Source: Rolling Stone, via the-king-lives)

Jun 24

Michael Jackson on the set of his 1986 Disney short film “Captain EO”